Robin Cameron, Strathcona Sky, 2016

“It was summer when I moved from Vancouver. I remember the last house I lived in was on Union Street, near the market. In front of the house there was a pink rose garden, the wood siding was painted light blue, and my room was painted yellow. I would walk past the market in the morning and get breakfast on my way to work. There were a lot of friends living nearby, in house shares, over garages or in bad manors with a hotplate and a shared bathroom. This was the neighborhood that if you were bored you could just wander around or go into McLean Park and find someone to talk to. Some Sundays there was lazy soccer where everyone playing was also drinking a beer, other days it was just sitting in the grass. I spent countless hours in that park, talking and watching life go by. There was something seductive about staying in Strathcona, it pretty much had everything you could ever want. I’d walk around the corner to Jonny’s house and we’d listen to records, falling asleep in his lofted bed to make a greasy breakfast in the morning with his roommates. He kept trying to break it off, and me persistently saying, look, I’m not your girlfriend. That summer he gave me a tape, which I kept to this day. I remember packing up everything I owned, some clothes and books, and my bike in a box and walking out into the park to say goodbye. Looking up I realized I’d miss seeing the stars in the big city.”

Robin Cameron (CAN, 1981, lives and works in New York) works in an array of media, ranging from ceramics and sculpture, photograms, cyanotypes, slide projections, to video and printmaking. She graduated in 2012 with a MFA from Columbia University, New York. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Cameron’s artist’s books are held in the collection of the library of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Cameron’s practice has grown out of making artists’ books. Books, became a way to structure her work, learn about art history and how to position her work within it. The works in her practice are a mix of media, from ceramic and brass sculpture, to cyanotypes and printmaking. Her work is usually constructed in a fragmentary nature. Either by firing discarded clay into anthropomorphized shapes, creating faces in photograms or collaging a chine collé print, the parts come together to create a whole. These works are both conceptual and beautiful at the same time. Thematically her work discusses ideas of identity, process, truth, language, and productive failure.

www.robincameron.org

Robin Cameron, Strathcona Sky, 2016
Robin Cameron
Strathcona Sky, 2016
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Robin Cameron, Strathcona Sky, 2016
Robin Cameron
Strathcona Sky, 2016
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Robin Cameron, Who You, I See, 2014
Robin Cameron
Who You, I See, 2014
Edition of 500
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Robin Cameron, Ribless, 2013, ceramic with metal stand and wood base, 22.5 x 13 x 12 in
Robin Cameron
Ribless, 2013
ceramic with metal stand and wood base
22.5 x 13 x 12 in
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Robin Cameron, E, 2013, cyanotype on paper
Robin Cameron
E, 2013
cyanotype on paper
8 x 10 in
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Robin Cameron, A-Z (Q), 2013, Brass and magnets, 8 x 10 in
Robin Cameron
A-Z (Q), 2013
brass and magnets
8 x 10 in
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Robin Cameron, Movement III, 2014, chine collé print, japanese paper, wheat paste, 180 x 72 in
Robin Cameron
Movement III, 2014
chine collé print, japanese paper, wheat paste
180 x 72 in
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Robin Cameron chine colle detail 2014
Robin Cameron
detail Movement III, 2014
chine collé print, japanese paper, wheat paste
180 x 72 in
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Robin Cameron, Faint Collapse (sunbathing in Turin), 2014, ceramic
Robin Cameron
Faint Collapse (sunbathing in Turin), 2014
ceramic
6 × 48 × 84 in
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Robin Cameron - two works from 2011
top: Robin Cameron, Drawing While Walking, 2011, oilstick on paper, 24 x 40 in
bottom: Robin Cameron, Mise-en-abyme, 2011, whitewash on mirror, 22 x 24.5 in
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Robin Cameron, Yves Klein Video, 2012
Robin Cameron
Yves Klein Video, 2012
video with typeset book page, and headphones
dimensions variable
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